J.E. D'Ulisse

For David Walley

Like a boxer, he was light on his feet, he hit from the center of his weight outward, and you didn’t know where it was gonna come from, but it always connected.

Welcome To Lolita-Land

Lolita is obscene. It is a love story, but there is nothing redeeming in this love, only the all-consuming sexual obsession of our pedophilic hero.
 
Lolita Mpegs—Free Young Teen Movies… This site is dedicated to young slut movies… Lolita Mpegs is STRONGLY against all forms of child pornography…

The Death of Karol Wojtyla

04.25.2005 | J.E. D'Ulisse | Letters From Abroad | 3 Comments
I wonder if there is a pundit’s club where they claim religious leaders. The Left gets the Dali Lama, no matter his opposition to abortion and condoms, and the Right gets John Paul II, no matter his attacks on materialism and his unflinching opposition to both the death penalty and the war in Iraq.

The Disappearance of a Lover's Face

I was shocked by the photo of a former lover...

Derrida (1930-2004)

12.24.2004 | J.E. D'Ulisse | The Academy | 1 Comment
The accusation that Derrida was an obscuritanist is absurd. There has never been a writer of greater clarity.

Debris -- Murder and Regret

I spent the next three days pushing buttons. I wanted to help and they told me the best way to help was to do what I was told. That's how I got my Emmy. For doing what I was told and watching people jump out of the Twin Towers, in fast forward and reverse. Some sixty times I watched the Towers fall. Like a chimp in a Skinner box.

Napoli, Mi'Amore

The Japanese have fallen in love with this city because of a near unlimited supply of extraordinary sea food, because of its pizza (the best in the world), because of the cheap, hip clothing and cafes, and -- don't let the teenagers riding Vespas haphazardly on jam-packed sidewalks fool you -- because Napoli is possibly the most laid back place in the world, and the Japanese really need to relax.

King Leer's Cheesecake Dreams -- Our Man Remembers Russ Meyer 

10.7.2004 | J.E. D'Ulisse | Film | 2 Comments
When Kirk arrives, he stands at the end of the street, framed in the eternal High Noon shootout shot. From behind the camera, two of the women, one on each side, walk into the frame until their collective derrieres consume it. It is magnificent.

Viva Roxy Music!

09.21.2004 | J.E. D'Ulisse | Music, Unfairly Forgotten | 2 Comments
The women on the cassette cover didn't look like the plastic women I had seen on MTV but like women that you could actually meet. I needed this album. It was called Country Life by the band Roxy Music. It was better than porn.

Our Vibrant Subjectivities

09.10.2004 | J.E. D'Ulisse | Literature | 3 Comments
There is this point where all other possible points meet. You could see it if you were lying in just the right way, looking at just the right place. It is the absolute point from which one could perceive an absolute objectivity. To see it is to perceive what God perceives. Oddly enough, since you have to be lying in just the right way, looking at just the right place, it is a subjective experience.

Ramallah IV -- Under the Light of the Electric Mosque

"I would sleep in the back of the truck as my father drove down, dodging the Israeli tax police. Through the night he would stop, sell a chicken and butcher it. All night driving, selling and killing chickens, and I would sleep in the pickup, surrounded by them. In the morning we would be back in Gaza and I would go to school. We did this every night for five years."

Ramallah Dispatch III -- Colonial Love

Ramallah is full of lingerie shops. Ergo Ramallah is full of children.

Ramallah Dispatch II -- Hummus and Coffee

Disapproval of beheadings is expressed to me incessantly, since I am the room's representative of the West. "This is not Islam," says one of the secretaries. "I know," I reply from my culturally aware up-on-high. "No I mean it's really not. It says in the Koran that if you kill an animal you should do it with one stroke of a sharp blade."

Under the Light of the Electric Mosque I -- The Parabola

The soldiers are afraid and it is written on their faces: Does this person have a bomb? Or a piece of a bomb to be put together in Tel Aviv? Will the next bomb that goes off in Jerusalem have passed by me? The mistake they make here might not kill them, it could kill a family member instead. Still you can only feel fear full on for so long before it's all just boredom.